We Need More Law Schools. Yes. We Really Do. Here’s Why.

Many people talk about Access to Justice (A2J), the big legal movement of the 21st century. But the biggest hurdle to A2J is the delivery of the legal education itself. The organization who controls what constitutes a valid education to gain a license to practice law is the American Bar Association (ABA). They determine accreditation. And as we all know, in order to sit for the bar exam you have to have graduated from an ABA-accredited law school (with the exception of California, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming).

Yes, it’s true. The ABA is the greatest hurdle to providing access to justice for the millions in this country who need affordable legal services. Let me tell you why.

The Power of Networks Is Not Just For Commercial Legal Companies Anymore – Guest Lecture with Tony Lai

Amazon transformed the retail industry by networking small businesses together. It eventually replaced the individuality of each small business with it’s own ‘brand’, Amazon. Eventually, small businesses were able to reduce their overhead further by cutting out their physical real estate, cutting employees and simply marketing and selling their goods through Amazon. This on-demand online company is a ‘networked platform’ and meets the customer where they are. Imagine a network for lawyers that has nothing to do with a commercially branded company, but through bar associations, or through certain law schools or an AmLaw 100 firm. Imagine a network for solos in a given state or region. Imagine a network driven by the lawyers. This is an eye-opening guest lecture which will help you to envision practicing the way you want to practice. Listen and learn.

Can Lawyers Learn How To Run A Business From Online Entrepreneurs?

Now I know there is a huge debate about whether attorneys should engage in the “practice of law” or the “business of law”. However, I think this debate misses the mark. The salient question is – how can we continue to serve our clients’ legal needs while keeping up with their expectations for business? In other words, how can we practice law and maintain the business persona that our customers expect?

Mastering the Sales Re-Cycle – Guest Lecture with Jared Correia

Do you think a signed retainer agreement is the beginning or end of your marketing to gain a client? The beginning or end of the ‘sale’? Today we talk about the reality that once a client retains you it is just the beginning of the sales ‘re-cycle’ – the continuing process of re-affirmations that the client made the right choice in selecting you as their attorney. Listen and learn.

How to CYA without Looking Like an A

“You never told me that!” Those are words a lawyer never wants to hear, but unfortunately many of us do. That’s why CYA (cover your a$$) can be so important.

Often a lawyer’s interaction with a client occurs during one of the most stressful times of the client’s life. Although it may be a routine matter to the lawyer, it may be the only time the client has ever been in this circumstance. Just when the client needs full brain power to comprehend new and complicated concepts, stress negatively impacts the client’s ability to think and remember. So put yourself in your client’s shoes and see how you can make their experience easier while covering yourself.

How to Create an Email Signature in Outlook

Creating an email signature will automatically put whatever you want at the bottom of every email. You can create different signatures for different emails. For instance you may have a signature for emails that are internal to your organization and another signature for emails that go outside your organization. You could have another signature for emails sent to your family and perhaps another that you use for your volunteer work. There are two ways to create an email signature. Learn how.

The Great “Business vs Profession” Debate

Over the years I have witnessed a few vigorous debates where the point of contention was over whether the practice of law is a business or a profession. I am sometimes taken aback by the positions some lawyers take.

There are those who really do find the notion of equating the practice of law in any way, shape, or form with the running of a business as an extremely offensive position. In the opposite corner stands the attorney who is in it solely for the money and views the very existence of our rules of professional conduct as a personal affront. Thus, the great debate.

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