How To Protect The Health of Your Practice and Yourself During a Pandemic and the Rest of Your Lives – Guest Lecture with Cynthia Sharp and Becky Howlett

Did you know the World Health Organization has classified ‘Burnout’ as a health issue? Did you know that burnout is not based on the number of hours you work but the quality of those hours? Cynthia Sharp and Becky Howlett founded legalburnout.com, a resource to help solo and small firm practitioners navigate the emotional roadmap of solo/small firm practice to keep you healthy and grounded through a pandemic and the rest of your lives. This information-packed podcast will have you taking action immediately to help ground you and elevate you at the same time. Listen and learn.

(2020 Update) The First 30 Seconds of A Client Call Can Make Or Break Your Solo Practice

Statistics Support There is Much At Stake

It is imperative your law practice be in control of client contacts (or touchpoints) and set the tone (and extend your brand) early because the backlash can be swift and costly. According to a BIA/Kelsey report, phone calls influenced more than $1 trillion in consumer spending in 2019. The average American tells 15 people about a poor experience—and you’ll feel the impact on your business in large part because of the power of the internet. As I’ve discussed before, the internet has made it extremely easy for a dissatisfied client to share negative reviews about your firm with some furious keystrokes and one final push of the ‘enter’ key. Read on….

There Is No New Normal!

Recognize that change is constant. Sometimes change occurs gradually and at other times, for instance during a global pandemic, it comes at us like a tsunami. Regardless, in order to responsibly adapt to change, it must not only be recognized, the consequences thereof must also be understood. If change is too quickly normalized, the consequences too easily become minimized if not completely ignored.

How to Develop a Rock Star Law Firm Team

This article will improve your odds of hiring the right person at the right time for the right seat – and developing them into a rock star team member. Smart hiring will reduce: ibuprofen purchases, “why me” crying episodes, the rapid outflow of cash better spent on pepperoni rolls in Pittsburgh’s Strip or the Reading Terminal, and wasted time that could be spent watching the 1978 Steeler season with your bubble mates.

Allow yourself a little grace for past mistakes and let’s map out the steps to make good things happen from here on out.

2020 ‘Let’s Get Back to School Safely’ Special – First Month’s Tuition – $99

2020 has been filled with unprecedented craziness. We’ve read about walking sharks*, asteroids heading our way**, chocolate snow falling in Switzerland***, and even a nudist in Germany chasing a wild boar who stole his iPad**** And this is just the tip of the iceberg. So, it’s now back to school time and school is shaping up to look very different for everyone.

Solo Practice University school has always been online and safe and secure from your home or office or home office! However, we also know that finances are a little tighter than normal due to events impacting us all. 2020 will eventually end and we will welcome a brand new 2021. But until then, get armed with the knowledge you need to creatively build an exciting and profitable practice.

In keeping with our mission of making life and practice more affordable, we’re making it easier than ever for you to join Solo Practice University.

Learn more…..

How to Avoid Third Party Payor Problems

An insured recently called wanting to discuss third party payors because representation of his client had just ended and he didn’t know what to do with the excess funds that remained in trust. In light of that call, I thought it worthwhile to cover the basics. Afterall, when one person is asking, that implies others have questions as well.

Tails and Prior Acts – Covering Future and Past Exposures

I recently took two calls almost back to back, and was surprised by both conversations. One came from an attorney who was retiring in another month or so. He had a few general malpractice insurance questions. The second was from an associate attorney with a small firm that was about to be dissolved. This associate was quite concerned about some decisions the partners were making regarding the firm’s malpractice coverage. What struck me was, other than the associate who called, the attorney decisionmaker’s at both firms didn’t seem to understand what a tail and/or prior acts coverage are. How much do you really know?

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