When ‘Going Green’ Could Very Well Put You In The Red

It’s very exciting to embrace technology. It’s new, it’s shiny, it’s fast. Every law practice management consultant tells you you will fall behind if you don’t. Myself included. However, as I have written before, you must embrace the technology gap from the perspective of your client. Not every client wants this. Not every client is capable of embracing it. Not every client will feel comfortable. And just as some embrace the latest technology, the goal post for ‘latest’ moves. And lest we forget, every consultant tells you to build a client-centric practice in order to succeed.

So, how do we build a client-centered practice which remains technologically progressive but understands not all customers are technologically progressive? how do we stay efficient and friendly and not alienate our clients, or worse, they fail to hire to us?

Can Embracing Any and All Digital Tech Lead to Trouble?

In a number of jurisdictions, the commentary to Rule of Professional Conduct 1.1 Competency states that lawyers are to keep abreast of the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology. Keeping this language in mind, allow me to ask if you actually take this language to heart? I ask because in my world while I often find that lawyers do a pretty good job of evaluating the benefits of any technology they are considering using in their practices, it’s evaluating the risks that seems to get the short shrift in the decision-making process. Afterall, taking time to investigate any potential downsides to whatever the next must have digital tech tool is can be such a killjoy.

What Clients Want: Managing Legal Consumer Expectations in 2019-2020 – Guest Lecture(s) with Jared Correia

Jarred and I have recorded five free guest lectures covering the vast topic of  What (Clients) Want: Managing  Legal Consumer Expectations in 2019-2020.  It is nearly five hours of us discussing in depth: How Legal Consumers Find Law Firms What Legal Consumers Want Marketing Requirements for a Modern Law Firm Intake Procedures/Forms How Modern Law […]

Are You Tech-Competent and Compliant With the New Rules? Guest Lecture with Jared Correia:

Technology competence and compliance are more important than ever today and new rules have been put into place which you must observe. Who better to discuss how to fulfill your obligations than Jarred Correia. Listen and learn as we talk about the challenges and the solutions to this 21st century mandate for successful practice.

Juice Jacking, Say What???

As with any cyber threat, prevention starts with awareness of the risk and, as a road warrior, I see people taking an unnecessary risk far too often. This one involves smart phones.

Here’s the problem. The cable you use to charge your phone is the same one you use to transfer or sync your data. This reality creates an attack vector that someone could take advantage of during the charging process. Read on.

Ditching the Disclaimer

What goes in your professional email? What if your email server occasionally marks something as “read” which in fact has not been read? How do you respond to that? Should you include your email signature every single time or only the first time you respond? What belongs and does not belong in an email signature? What about typos? When does an email become too long and you’d be better off just writing a proper letter? What about graphics in email signatures? Or funny quotations?

And what about that long list of disclaimers many of us lawyers append to every single email signature?

Should You Kill Your Email Inbox to Regain Efficiency? Maybe.

By a show of hands, how many of you look forward to opening your email inbox every morning when you arrive at the office? I see. You sadistic types who raised your hand may put it down now while the other 99% of us discuss the topic at hand – your email inbox. So, should you kill your email inbox? Read this article and its tips and tell me what you think.

Is Texting Clients A Good Idea? Maybe, Maybe Not.

Texting is ubiquitous in our culture, which makes it too easy to embrace that reality by texting day and night regardless of the setting just like everyone else does. The question I’d like to ask is this. Is doing so a good thing, particularly for a lawyer? Remember recent rule changes. Comment 8 to ABA Model Rule 1.1 Competency reminds lawyers that they are to “keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice to include the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology.” If you are communicating with clients via text messaging, have you thought about the ramifications of doing so?

Pin It on Pinterest