You’ve Decided to Go Out on Your Own. Now What?

There is no shortage of voices out there offering tips to attorneys who are looking to go out and start their own firm. Unfortunately, with so many lengthy articles, e-books, webinars, and other resources circulating, it can be hard for attorneys to narrow down this information into practical, actionable items they can take to help make their new venture a success.

Here are a few pieces of advice that we have heard from solos time and time again and they just might help you shorten the learning curve.

Hail to the Chief (of Staff)

We all know our training and experience crosses over into other industries. If we are planning to rezoom, should we cast a wider net? That is exactly what this month’s spotlighted rezoomer has done. With no intention of leaving the law and having been hired after rezooming her practice, Kerry Marrano found herself looking at a position within town government that has fulfilled her desire to rezoom. Here’s her journey.

(Free Webinar) Simple Lessons to Improve Your Law Practice and Your Life

Is it possible to improve your law practice and your life at the same time? Yes! You really can increase your productivity and improve your practice and your life. Every day, lawyers help to change their clients’ lives for the better. But all too often, you can lose sight of this reality and get caught up in your hectic daily routine. It’s time for you to change your life for the better and this webinar focuses on strategies to help you do just that.

Back to School Special! First Month’s Tuition – $127

If it’s fall, it’s back to school. It’s all about learning, educating ourselves, expanding our minds and putting all that knowledge to use in exciting, creative and profitable ways. And we’re all about the exciting, creative and profitable ways for you to finally be your own boss. That’s why we’re offering this amazing Back to School Special. Check it out! Join! And share!

Withdrawing From the Client Who Owes You Money

Everyone wants to be paid for their services. If a lawyer has a client who has fallen behind in payments, and future payment does not appear to be forthcoming, a lawyer may try to withdraw from the representation. If you withdraw, how much information should you share about the reason for your withdrawal? Consider the following scenario.

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