Sharing Office Space Can be a Great Gig, Except When It Isn’t

Solo attorneys sometimes land in an office share setting. And look, I get it. The reasons for doing so can be compelling. There’s the savings on overhead, the presence of others who can provide personal and professional support, and the list goes on. While I have no desire to quash anyone’s desire to work in such a setting, I do feel compelled to share a story; because sometimes it’s just too easy to minimize and even ignore potential problems.

If You Don’t Have Legal Malpractice Insurance You Need To Know That …

Prospective client Diane has a complex legal issue in Illinois. Her matter will likely generate millions of dollars in revenue. She receives two referrals, one for Grace and one for Alan. Diane decides to search for these lawyers on the ARDC website (this is the disciplinary agency that regulates lawyers in Illinois) to learn more about them. Diane learns from the website that Grace does not have legal malpractice insurance; but Alan does. They have both been active Illinois licensed attorneys for 10 years. Who does she pick? Wait! This is not only not a silly question, but read the answer and the changes now being implemented for those who don’t have malpractice insurance. Illinois is leading significant changes. You’ll be glad you read this.

Planning A Soft Relaunch of Your Firm is Great During Holidays – Guest Lecture with Jared Correia

While recorded over the summer, the sentiment remains the same over any stretch of downtime. It is great to plan soft relaunches of your firm during slow periods. Soft relaunches can include the announcement of a new employee, new website design, rebranding, any number of changes in your firm that give you a new marketing opportunity. So, listen and learn. (Oh, and enjoy Jared’s heavy breathing. He gets excited for these podcasts!!)

Going to the Dogs, Cats, Birds and Horses

For the final column of 2017, highlighting attorneys who rezoomed their career, I thought I would update readers on my journey back into the law. It has been an incredibly enlightening, sometimes frustrating, yet joyful journey. Today, I find myself loving what I do and looking forward to going to work every morning. Doing what I am doing now means more to me than all the ups and downs of the last 6 years. Here’s my story.

Is Soliciting Crowdfunded Donations for Payment of Fees a Good Idea?

While crowdfunding models vary, there are primarily two general approaches. One is an investment model where the contributor invests funds in exchange for some kind of benefit. The other model is the donation approach, where the donor has no expectation of a return or benefit, and this is the model I’m going to discuss.

Let’s start with a potential client who has no ability to cover your fees. Would it be ethically permissible to solicit donations through a crowdfunding source as a way to have your fees paid?

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