Clio

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Clio is the leading practice management, time & billing and client collaboration platform for solos and small firms. Completely web-based, Clio allows you to securely manage your practice from anywhere – from your PC, your Mac, and even your iPhone.

Features:
Clio’s clean interface and intuitive design allow you to get up and running with ease. All Clio users have access to:

  • A free 30-day trial;
  • Bank-Grade Encryption;
  • Matter / case management;
  • Task management & calendaring;
  • Time & billing;
  • Trust accounting;
  • Client collaboration;
  • Unlimited live support and training;
  • Free data migrations;
  • And much, much more!

With no contracts and a free 30-day trial, Clio helps you hang your own shingle with ease.

Learn more about Clio at http://www.goclio.com/, or contact 1-888-858-2546 x 1 to speak with a member of the Clio team.

Be sure to ask about our special discount for all students and faculty at Solo Practice University®.

Students and faculty at Solo Practice University® receive a discount on this item. You must be logged in to see the amount of the discount and the discount code. Enroll now to enjoy SPU benefits.

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6 comments on “Clio

  • I have been happily using Clio for several months.

    If you are interested in how Clio can work for your practice, please read my article published in Law.com for my thoughts.
    Clio Review

  • I am one week into my 30-day trial, and I just received an online payment in response to a bill posted using Clio’s ClientConnect feature.

    It just works. Wow.

    I”ve gone from Amicus to Daylite to Clio.

    Clio, “I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.”

  • I was appointed to an emergency removal case this past Friday and have been going full-throttle all week. I’ve had to stop a couple of times and make sure that I properly document my time, notes, mileage, etc., so I can provide substantive supporting documentation when the time comes for me to submit my bill.

    Based on Kira’s article in Law.com and Kevin’s feedback, I decided to trial the Clio product. I like it. It resembles Amicus in many ways, but is a lot friendlier and more intuitive (translation – I jumped right into it).

    I like it and anticipate being a long term subscriber once my trial is over.

  • I downloaded Clio several days ago and have been happily exploring the features. I love the simplicity, and I’m happy to have a mobile app that works on my iPhone since I work in several locations.

    Although I’m not presently being paid for mytime, I’m using Clio to track my expenses, my mileage, and my time. I have my documents at my fingertips, no matter whose computer I’m using, and I think I’ll be subscribing long-term. This couldn’t be simpler!

  • I used Clio for several months and thought it was a good product with great potential. But, I ended up canceling my subscription because:

    (a) The monthly fee is too high.

    $50/month seemed reasonable to me at first. But with each passing month, I questioned whether I was really getting sufficient bang for my buck. To me, the beauty of Clio is its streamlined interface to multiple “in the cloud” applications. But, for my purposes at least, I already had the functionality I needed through Google Apps Premier at $50/year.

    (b) The client collaboration interface is not user-friendly.

    Here’s what I really wanted from Clio: A secure and easy way to collaborate and share documents with clients who can do basic online transactions (e.g., buy something on Amazon), but are in no other sense “tech savvy.”

    I think the Clio client portal feature has real potential to achieve that goal — but it’s not there yet. (At least, it wasn’t the last time I attempted to use it, which was several months ago.)

    (c) The timekeeping, billing and trust accounting functions are not important to my practice.

    I bill fixed fees per task – so tracking time, generating and sending bills, and managing trust accounts are not terribly important to me. But I did have the chance to use these features of Clio (while doing some consulting work) and was very impressed. So, if you bill by the hour, send bills to clients, accept retainers, etc., definitely check out what Clio has to offer.

    (d) Clio had limitations that were annoying at times.

    A couple of examples:

    When you enter a business expense for a matter, there isn’t a way to attach a copy of the expense receipt to the entry.

    When entering an individual contact, you are required to enter that individual’s “Company” (and that Company is then added as a separate contact.) My clients are consumers, so I don’t need to keep track of this Company information and I didn’t like the unneeded Company information cluttering up my Contacts.

    (Of course, I ran into these issues months ago – so things could have changed.)

    (e) No ability to “tap” into the database to generate custom reports, custom functionality, etc.

    Clio makes keeping track of clients and matters easy. But installing a gatekeeper (even a benevolent one) between you and your data makes innovating pretty difficult. I don’t believe Clio offers a way to create a real-time link to the data. And I felt that put undesirable constraints on my ability to innovate using the latest technology.

    In summary, Clio is a good product and getting better. But it wasn’t right for my practice.

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