The Fallacy of Trying to Find a Healthy Work-Life Balance

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock of late, I suspect you are well aware of the rise of the attorney wellness movement within our profession. Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not here to challenge the importance and value of all that’s going on. While I will admit I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around this mindfulness thing, and when it comes to yoga, well let’s just say I’m more comfortable in the weight room, I do deeply believe our profession is in a crisis, in part, for want of attorney wellness.

For years so many, myself included, have talked about the importance of trying to find a healthy balance between one’s work life and one’s personal life as part of the answer to this crisis. Those who tried and succeeded did so believing that, once there, all would be good with the world. I’m not buying it anymore, and with this post, I am publicly stating I will never encourage anyone to try to find a healthy work-life balance again!

Part 4: Parkinson’s Law and Practicing Law

Time and money are so interchangeable these days. We started exchanging time for money at our first few jobs where we clocked in to start getting paid and when we clocked out, the money stopped. Now that you own a law practice you have access to this new way to view time as it relates to money because you now have residual power. Residual money is not money you clock in and out for, it’s the money you receive because you have created a service supported by systems and aided by people (that are not you) that removes your money’s dependency on your hours. But the quest to discovering your residual money formula is more complex than just clocking in and out. Learn more.

Why Buy A Lawyers Professional Liability Policy?

Lawyers and those in their employ can and will make a mistake from time to time. It happens. Should a significant misstep ever occur on one of your matters, what might the fallout be? Think about this as a member of our learned and honorable profession. Clearly the client will be harmed in some fashion. Now, put yourself in your client’s shoes and ask who should be held responsible, particularly if a financial loss is part of the equation? You know darn well what the answer is. After all, if a lawyer representing you on a personal injury matter blew a statute that resulted in a lost opportunity for any kind of recovery, you would expect to be made whole and you know it. This is why I don’t get the excuses. Purchasing malpractice insurance isn’t about protecting lawyers. It’s about protecting clients should something go wrong, which makes it, at least in my mind, the right thing to do.

Part 3: Know Your Profitability

Getting real with your numbers can be a difficult journey. What you think is going on financially in your firm can come into question very quickly once you crunch the numbers and they’re staring you in the face. We love the numbers because they don’t lie. There is no opinion and no bias, if the numbers don’t add up they simply don’t add up. The first step to understanding your firms’ profit is to figure out where it’s coming from.

A Checklist for Closing Your Solo/Small Firm Practice

Common reasons lawyers close their practices include a medical disability, wanting to retire, a move out-of-state, or a career change. While the specific steps that need to be taken and the time frame involved can vary significantly depending upon the reasons driving the closure and the type of practice being closed, the following checklist covers the basics of what most lawyers will need to think about.

Accounting Avoidance Syndrome – Why this Boring Crap Matters

You want more time with your family and do the things you love doing (besides practicing law). You also wanted a plethora of funds to support this. It would make sense that you now monitor these two things, time and money, like a hawk to make sure you’re getting what you originally set out to get from all this, right? Nope, in fact many practice owners run from basic accounting requirements (if this is you, for the love of law please keep reading). So why are you running from the thing you set out to gain?

Oh, I Shouldn’t Have Said That

I recently asked several of our claims attorneys to identify the top habits they felt new lawyers should develop from day one. Most of what they shared was what I anticipated claims attorneys would say; but one item caught my attention, and the more I thought about it, the more I realized how right they were. In short, all lawyers, not just new lawyers, need to know how to write well. Do you?

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